No Hawks seen during today's visit - July 31st, 2015

I spent two hours looking for the Washington Square Park Red-tailed Hawks today but found none unfortunately.

I walked from WSP to Union Square Park then back down to WSP again to no avail. Not seeing any Hawks isn't all that unusual but in light of the dead fledgling found yesterday, it cast a rather grim tone to my visit.


Sad news: Dead juvenile Hawk found near Washington Square Park - July 30th, 2015

I just received the word from Urban Park Ranger Rob Mastrianni who was called to pick up a dead juvenile Red-tailed Hawk at 4th Avenue and 9th Street, which is a few blocks northeast from Washington Square Park.

The street map below shows the corner of the park on the left and the intersection where the juvenile was found on the right:


He will have contacted the Horvaths of WINORR (Wildlife in Need of Rescue & Rehabilitation) by the time you read this post. A necropsy will be performed on the fledgling but so far it appears that the death may have been caused by physical trauma (perhaps a crash into a building). I will post any updates I may receive on the outcome of the necropsy.

Some of the Tompkins Square Park Hawk-watchers and bloggers have been notified so that they may keep an eye out to see if perhaps one of their fledglings is missing. The intersection where the fledgling was found is right at the boundary between both Hawk families' territories. 

A fellow WSP Hawk-watcher who is in the vicinity now just told me they were watching one fledgling and (most likely) Sadie on a building at 5th Avenue and 12th Street (a few blocks from where the dead fledgling was found). That building is a regular hangout spot for the WSP Red-tailed Hawks. So in any case, at least one WSP fledgling is accounted for at the moment.

-7:30PM

*Update: The results of the necropsy are discussed in this post.

Both fledglings reported seen today - July 28th, 2015

I'm a bit tied up with project deadlines and we're at the start of another heat wave so my Hawking may be curtailed for a few days. 

However, I received some welcome news this morning as a fellow Hawk-watcher reported seeing both Washington Square Park fledglings. :)

Fledgling soars to new heights, Bobby in the trees - July 25th, 2015

I spotted one of the fledglings flying to the Bobst Library roof upon my arrival to Washington Square Park today.

I liked seeing the red glow of the library's stone reflected on the fledgling's belly:



The fledgling then flew to the Judson Memorial Church cross:




My fellow Hawk-watchers and I sat and watched the fledgling on the cross for an hour and a half as it preened and otherwise relaxed:






It then dove down then flew over the western tree tops and out of sight:



I spotted Bobby sitting in the trees when we went to look for the fledgling:




He made a rather low dive off his branch then disappeared.

I heard the sound of a fledgling crying several minutes later but it was hard to trace.

I then saw that the fledgling was extremely high in the sky, circling and soaring higher than we could recall.

I compared the markings on the underside of the wings to other photos of this season's fledglings and I believe this soaring fledgling was the one we saw on the cross and is "F2", the second Hawk to have fledged.



Tortoise escapes a fledgling by a hair - July 23rd, 2015

The second Hawk baby to have fledged (F2) was flying from tree to tree in hunting mode this morning when I dropped by Washington Square Park.


It spotted a pet tortoise on the lawn and flew over to have a look:



The fledgling hovered above the tortoise for a second before continuing on and landing in a nearby tree:



It looked like the fledgling was only curious about the strange creature but regardless, I helped its owner guard the little tortoise while the fledgling was still close by. 


The fledgling resumed looking for rats and mice in the low brush:


It flew over the bushes where it caught a rat on July 18th then landed in a new tree:




Off to another part of the park:




The fledgling then flew from the west side of the park, to the east side, then south after it and I noticed Sadie circling the southern section with food.


The fledgling is seen right above the gray structure in the photo below:


The fledgling flew to the far eastern side of the park:


It took a few minutes but I finally located it on the east-facing side of NYU's Silver Center:


I had to follow the sound of its cries in order to locate it.

Preening:





On the north-facing side of NYU's Shimkin building, still crying:


As I've mentioned before, this fledgling is a real cry baby:




It flew to the top railing of Silver:


It spotted mama Hawk Sadie sitting atop One Fifth Avenue so it started crying more earnestly. It then leapt off the perch and made the long and high flight toward mom:



It landed on a level about halfway up the building:



Its flight was impressive to me because it was a pretty long and high distance to travel.

Sadie looked down upon the babe:



The fledgling landed on the top of the structure before hopscotching closer to Sadie:




The fledgling disappeared when it flew toward the back of the building.

Sadie descended and circled low above the fledgling:



She then landed on another corner of One Fifth:


The fledgling stopped trying to reach Sadie and landed on a lower perch on a neighboring building (a heat grate I've seen Hawks on for years).

A Mockingbird dive-bombed it:



Sadie flew to the south side of the park again:


The fledgling followed:


Both Hawks flew out of sight a block south of the park.

I then saw Bobby and Sadie circling in the sky above the park several minutes later:


They both left the park, one following the other. I left for the day since I'd already been there for a couple of hours and got my fill of some good Hawk action.

It's been a few days since I and a fellow Hawk-watcher have confirmed seeing both fledglings at the same time. There's still a good chance the first fledgling is around. It is more advanced than F2 and has been exploring areas further away from the park so it has not been surprising that it's been more difficult to locate.